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World renowned firearms manufacturer Smith & Wesson continued to shake up both the company and the firearms industry recently with the announcement they are in the process of changing their name. The iconic company name was a result of efforts by Horace Smith & D. B.

Smith & Wesson Name Change in the Works

Smith & Wesson Name Change in the WorksWorld renowned firearms manufacturer Smith & Wesson continued to shake up both the company and the firearms industry recently with the announcement they are in the process of changing their name. The iconic company name was a result of efforts by Horace Smith & D.B. Wesson in the middle 1850’s and spawned a legendary name and lines of firearms that have served police and military units in the United States and around the world for more than 100 years. Smith & Wesson is an American icon the same way Sturm Ruger and Winchester were. The name and company will not be disbanded or sold off, instead it will be a division known as Smith & Wesson Firearms as the “old” company rebrands itself to American Outdoor Brands Corp. This name apparently has won over company shareholders who overwhelmingly voted to agree to the name change and corporate shake up, according to a released statement. The move follows the recent shake up trend within the company, as we recently announced Smith & Wesson recently purchased grip manufacturer Crimson Trace and tool maker Taylor brands for 95 million and 85 million respectively. The company says that the name change and recent acquisitions continues the board of directors long term vision of diversifying company holdings to protect it against stock market volatility. In more Smith & Wesson related news that we somehow missed the company also in November finalized the purchase of Jacksonville, Florida based UST Brands for $32 million dollars. UST Brands is a smaller sized company and maker of survival and outdoor style equipment. The rate at which Smith & Wesson is acquiring companies is shocking some industry insiders. Many in the firearms industry are openly questioning the motives of the Smith & Wesson board of directors and wondering how exactly the company has managed to pull off three deals in four months that drew $212 million out of the company piggy bank. It will be interesting to see if these moves by an industry giant like Smith & Wesson will have an effect on it’s competitors. Image Courtesy:ustbrands.com

Carbine Competition

Carbine Competition

Recently I attended a carbine competition. I didn’t place well. 7th out of 10 competitors. The course was a 400 meter shot requiring two hits, pop up movers from 3 positions, pop up movers prone at 300, and a 100 meter steel silhouette requiring a position change after each hit. I didn’t know what to expect going into the course. Didn’t know a soul other than an internet acquaintance from ARFCOM. I had plenty of questions for him before I went. It was a really important learning experience and I am glad I attended. Some things I learned for myself: Don’t forget your ammo. I left a loaded 15 round mag at home of with my reloads. I was forced to use wolf at the 100 meter silhouette. I felt like this event was in the bag. I practice on targets that size and smaller all the time at home. Standing and kneeling were first round hits, but prone I couldn’t hit the thing. I can’t blame wolf at the moment until I test it and it’s zero at the range. It might have changed my zero, but then again maybe it didn’t. Shouldn’t have made that much of a difference at 100 yards but then again I couldn’t hit the target prone. Prone is my best position. The A2 stock is long. After the 100 meter silhouette I examined my setup. I had a real hard time getting a nose to charging handle cheek wield on the 3 position timed silhouette. This could be a compounding reason I couldn’t hit the darn thing, especially at prone. The other stages allowed my time to setup my prone position to perfection. This course did not. The timer threatened me as well as knowing I would have to pop back up to kneeling position after a hit. The thing I remember though is how my face was all over that stock. I scored way more hits on my targets at 200 and 300 meters then I did on this 100 meter silhouette. Since I intend to use the SAME EXACT rifle for XTC matches AND carbine courses it needs to fit both roles well while being easily modified back and forth for both competitions. Luckily I found this in the CMP rule book: “(10) The M16A1 rifle (short) butt stock or the commercial equivalent, or a fixed length aftermarket stock that will reduce the length of pull to no less than 10 inches may be installed on an M16A2 or M16A4 rifle or the commercial equivalent. Any aftermarket stock must have the same external characteristics as the A2 or A1 stocks except for the shorter length.“ So I can switch from a A2 length stock to an A1 length stock and still be legal for CMP and XTC. This is the first needed change to my setup. I put my upper on to my Cav Arms lower and it felt much better being that it is A1 length… although it is obviously not CMP legal. Things that went right : I had fun. My zero with my reloads: The A2 chopped rear was on and I made the right click adjustments before each stage. I dialed in my distance and things went well. Except at 100 yards. My rifle’s reliability: No one had any malfunctions. Neither did my rifle. It shot smooth and functioned well. Hitting targets at 400, 300, and 200 yards: I scored well on these stages. I placed higher than 3 competitors who were using optics. I was third place in the side match challenge. 7 yards 4 targets engaged in 1-4-2-3 order. First place went to an acog shooter, second to a red dot shooter, third fastest time was my irons. My new sling setup. Things that went wrong : The only other guy with irons beat me on overall standing. Didn’t bring enough of my own ammo. By accident. Need a water carrier. Need to play with my IBZ setup to learn where it hits out to 300 yards. A2 stock felt too long when used under stress. Poor nose to charging handle cheek wield. So its back to the range again with a few minor changes and some practice. I intend to examine how wolf affects my zero (if it does at all), and where my IBZ setting is actually hitting at 7 to 300 yards. Lets see what happens next time with a bit more practice and a few MINOR changes to my rifle. I would recommend readers attend a competition when they can. It was buckets of fun and I will be attending more in the future. A competition serves as a excellent benchmark for your skill level and will illustrate CLEARLY which areas you should be working on to improve your marksmanship. Here is my rifle as it currently sits: Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

Teensy, Tiny Thermal Optics: The T-10 series

Teensy, Tiny Thermal Optics: The T-10 series

As high end technology trickles down into the hands of the common man, we have begun to see a transition from extremely expensive thermal devices to basic thermal devices that are both compact and weapon capable. These are the TP-10 series from Torrey Pines Logic. These are very small rail mounted FLIR optics with fairly low resolution, but this is a step in the right direction for the prepared consumer. Finally, things are becoming miniaturized and affordable enough to give the citizenry a level playing field against well equipped opponents. The main use I have seen for this optic is on the side of a rail where it can act as a thermal spotter and the target would be engaged with the primary optic at that point… if you could see them. The high end model retails for $699 with each step down in model specs a hundred off the top. Product Highlights 80 x 60 FLIR Leptons Sensor 50° Field of View 8 to 14 μm Spectral Response 30 Hz Refresh Rate White Hot/Black Hot/Green/Color Polarity Non-Uniformity Correction Calibration Temperature Read-Out Auto-Power Save Mode Protects Battery Shuttered Sensor Quick Release Mount for Picatinny Rails I must say, these are exciting times. FLIR for everyone! I do so want one. Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

How to Clean & Lubricate Your Glock in 10 Minutes

How to Clean & Lubricate Your Glock in 10 Minutes

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Don’t Panic ! Cleaning your Glock is super easy and simple! Everything from the tools you need to how often you should be doing it, we’ll take you step-by-step through the whole process. Various Polymer 80 Glocks And also how to detail strip it for when it gets really dirty. We have a great video below based off official Glock instructions, but also tons of pictures below if you want to go at your own pace: If that helped, please subscribe to our YouTube channel since we’re adding new videos every week! How Often Should I Clean? A Glock is the AK-47 of pistols…it will keep on chugging no matter what you throw at it.  But for us, we still field strip and at least wipe down after each range session.  After about 1,000 rounds, we will do a detailed strip. Of course, you should also clean your gun anytime you see a major shift in accuracy or if something happens, like dropping it in the mud or spending a day in the rain or dust. See our top picks for the best Glocks ! Glock Field Stripping & Cleaning Field stripping just means disassembling a gun into its major components for routine cleaning and maintenance.  It’s super easy on the Glock since it breaks down into four main parts in a matter of seconds. We recommend the following tools for cleaning our Glocks and other guns, conveniently all of these tools, cleaners, and lube is found in the M-Pro 7 Cleaning Kit . M-Pro 7 Gun Cleaner M-Pro 7 Oil M-Pro 7 Copper Remover If you want some more great gun cleaning options, take a look at our 4 Best Gun Cleaning Kits ! All Tested "Gun Cleaning Kits" Now that you have your tools, find a decent place to work – a counter, table, or workbench all work great. Ensure any and all ammunition is removed from the area before you start cleaning your firearm! I like to lay down a towel or neoprene mat to soak up any spilled solvents and to catch the carbon, copper, and gunk that is cleaned from the weapon. Field Strip Before we strip, make sure your Glock is clear of any ammo – remove the magazine, rack the slide several times, then visually and tactilely (use your finger) to make absolutely sure the chamber is clear and your Glock is unloaded. Feel the chamber to make sure it is clear. Point your Glock in a safe direction and pull the trigger to dry fire it, once you hear the click – you’re ready to field strip. Pull back slightly on the slide while at the same time pulling down on the tabs that are on either side of the frame right above and forward of the trigger See the tab? Both of John’s index fingers are pointing to it. Easy! Once you pull down on the tabs, allow the slide to move forward and slip off of the frame. From here it is very simple to break down your Glock into it’s four main parts: Barrel, Frame, Slide, and Recoil Spring & Guide Rod. Glock 17 Field Striped: (top) Slide, (middle-left) Barrel, (middle-right) Guide Rod & Recoil Spring, (bottom) Frame. Cleaning the Barrel The barrel of your Glock is where the VAST majority of the dirt, carbon, and grim will hide – so that is what you want to clean first. Start with using a dry brush to push most of the crud out of your barrel. Make sure to always push the brush forward from the chamber to the muzzle. Run your brush back and forth at least 5 to 8 times or until you stop getting chunks of stuff . Dry Brush pushing from chamber to muzzle Next, take a gun cleaning patch and spray (or dribble, depending on what you’re using) some of your gun cleaner onto the patch – in our case, using the M-Pro 7 Gun Cleaner . Repeat by running the patch through your barrel from chamber to muzzle 7 to 10 times. Gun cleaning patch Take a clean patch and spray some cleaner on it, use that patch to just wipe down the outside of the barrel and to clean the feed ramps of the chamber – the feed ramps are the important part! See the ramp at the bottom of the barrel? That part is important! Clean it! Once the barrel is all shiny, inside and out, take a microfiber towel and wipe down the outside of the barrel to remove any excess cleaner, follow that by running some dry cleaning patches through the barrel until they start coming out clean the other end – this might take a couple of dry patches to accomplish. Clean patch! Ready to move on… Look down the barrel and visually check to make sure all the fouling has been removed, if you see a couple of stubborn dark spots – don’t sweat it and don’t go crazy trying to remove them. But for the most part, the barrel should be shiny and uniform. Once clean, put your barrel aside and clean the slide! Cleaning the Slide, Recoil Spring, and Guide Rod Take a brush and wrap the bristles with a gun cleaning patch, using that scrub/wipe down the inside of the slide focusing on the rear – this is where the important parts of the slide are and are where fouling will likely build up. Wrap your brush, helps make your brushes last longer! You’ll want to make sure you get the inside of the rails as well, this might require using a Q-Tip to really get in there. While not always required, taking the time to do the details now will ensure your Glock never malfunctions due to poor maintenance. Clean the rails, clean ’em good! Take the slide and point the muzzle end down toward the floor, using the brush clean the breech face – be sure to not tilt the slide around too much while doing this, the goal is to keep the fouling away from the rear of the slide and to knock it away from the breech face. Muzzle down, clean the breech face. Brushing down the recoil spring and guide rod is easy, just take the brush and…brush it. Once done, wipe it down using a towel or rag. Brush the recoil spring and guide rod. Cleaning the Frame and Magazine The hard parts are over now! Cleaning the frame might look like a lot of nooks and crannies, but really it just needs a good scrub and wipe down. Take a brush and scrub the top of the frame, focus on the slide rails in the front and the trigger bar in the back. Clean the rails with cleaner if needed. If fouling is really built up on your slide rails, you may need to take a patch and cleaner to it. Don’t be scared to give it a really good scrub down. Don’t forget to use a towel or rag to wipe off the cleaner after! Magazines are often forgotten when it comes to cleaning and truth be told, they very rarely need it. And most of the time that they do need it, it’s because they were dropped in mud or dirt and a hose can normally take care of that type of cleaning. But at least once in a while, it’s a good idea to disassemble your mags and give them the cleaning they deserve. Remove the base plate of your magazine using the Glock Disassembly Tool or a punch. Glock mag takedown using a punch Be careful and make sure that while removing the plate you keep your thumb over the exposed spring to prevent it from flying across the room once the plate is removed. Keep your thumb over the spring Once disassembled – simply take your brush and scrub down the inside and outside of the magazine, brush and wipe down the spring, and scrub the follower. If you’re feeling really detailed – go ahead and wipe down the baseplate and insert. To reassemble you’ll want to first make sure that you replace the follower on the correct end of the spring (the small end!). Follower goes on the SMALL END of the magazine spring! Then just push the spring back in, insert the retaining insert, and close it up by sliding the baseplate back into place. Slide the Glock baseplate back into place Lubricating your Glock Repeat after me: Less is more . Some people like to gun their firearms “wet” and while some guns truly need that, a Glock is not one of them. In fact, excess lubricate can hinder reliability as it holds on to more filth and grime. So, less is more. A light coating of lube is all you need on any of the parts. Start with the barrel – apply some lubricant to a cleaning patch and run it through your barrel using the same chamber to muzzle method 4 or 5 times – you might pick up some last bits of fouling doing this, feel free to ignore it. Oiled cleaning patch down the barrel 4 or 5 times Follow that with a dry patch to remove the extra lube. Next comes the outside of the barrel, just apply some lube to the barrel itself and use a patch to wipe it across the entire outside surface. Oil the barrel – see, less is more! And you guessed it, use your towel to wipe down the barrel to remove excess lube! Now you’ll want to do some targeted lubing where it is needed the most, the space between lugs on the bottom of the barrel… Oil the underside between the lugs And on the top of the barrel where the barrel interfaces with the slide… Oil the top of the barrel Then, once again, wipe up the excess with your towel. Now the slide! A dab of lube on the top rear of the slide where it interfaces with the barrel… Oil top rear part of the slide And on the front of the slide where the barrel will poke through – you’ll likely see some wear marks, that tells you where you need to lube. Oil where the barrel goes through the front of the slide itself Wipe up the excess lube before moving on to the inside of the slide. Just a touch of lube on the slide rails, 1 drop per side. You’ll want to use your finger or a patch to wipe it down and spread the lube around evenly. Drop of oil on slide rails Annnd again, remove excess with towel. Now for the frame! You may have heard this before – lube the slide rails! Oil the rails of the frame Also, add a bit of lube to the raised metal part in the rear of the frame that interfaces with the trigger bar. Oil the raised part of the trigger bar Wipe off excess one last time and you’re done! To assemble, insert your barrel, guide rod & recoil spring back into the slide and slide the slide back onto the frame. Assemble your Glock once all the parts are clean and lubed! FINALLY, point your gun in a safe direction and dry fire your weapon, rack the slide and dry fire again. Confirm that your weapon is functioning, your trigger is resetting as expected, and that nothing is gritty or out of place. That’s it! You’re done. Congratulations on a clean and well-maintained firearm. Glock Detailed Strip A simple "Glock Disassembly Tool" makes everything easier for the detailed strip. Glock 17 Full Detailed Strip This great video below goes into how to fully strip down the Glock.  Pay special attention to the removal and assembly of the pins, since there is a correct order.  We clean everything with our M-Pro 7 and oil the moving parts. Parting Shots Cleaning your firearms is an important part of shooting, it keeps them running, it preserves them, and it’s relaxing to do. While the Glock is legendary for reliability and ease of maintenance, it’s still a good idea to clean it regularly. Now that you’re more familiar with the inside of your Glock, maybe it’s time to make some upgrades to it! Take a look at our Best Glock Upgrades & Add-ons guide. How often do you clean your Glock? Let us know in the comments!

3rd Ranger Battalion & The Big Four

Growing up in 3rd Ranger Battalion, the Big Four were constantly stressed and evaluated throughout all phases of training. These skills were how the Regiment plied their trade and were the backbone of the unit’s training and mission execution. If you couldn’t keep up physically you got smoked until you thought your eyes were going to bleed, and then you were released for standards (RFS, reassigned according to the needs of the Army). If you couldn’t form up with your team in a stack and clear a room properly, conduct battle drill 1A, or any of the other six battle drills without causing harm to yourself or another member of your team, no one would trust you and didn’t make it in Battalion. If you couldn’t patch-up a buddy by properly applying a tourniquet, throw in a nasal cannula, or dress a wound with an Israeli bandage, then how were you ever going to save your ranger buddy’s life on the battlefield? What if you couldn’t shoot an E-type five meters to your front? The E Type Target 19.5″ x 40″ courtesy of Action Target We all know psyops has its place on the battlefield, and correct me if I’m wrong, but no war has ever been won by dropping pamphlets, handing out candy, or giving hugs to one another. Wars are won by dropping bombs and placing lethal effective fires into the flesh, bone, blood, and organs of the enemy. Marksmanship is the key to taking the pressure from the Big Four. More recently the 75th Ranger Regiment has moved to the Big Five, which encompasses the aforementioned and mobility. Jack Murphy explains the history and the change to the Big Five in his article The Evolution of the "75th Ranger Regiment" (pt. 2): Selecting and Building a Ranger . I remember a several years ago sitting in the office of a MSG Jared Van Aalst , then SSG, and listening to him tell me about why marksmanship should be the number one on the list of the Big Four. SSG Van Aalst was my first sniper platoon sergeant. He was one of the best marksmen I have ever witnessed, a knowledgeable friend, and a mentor. He was never shy of giving advice and his advice that day was some of the best I have heard on the necessity of an accurate marksman. Why should marksmanship be the number one priority? Of all the Big Four, marksmanship is the only skill that can take the pressure from physical training, battle drills, and medical training. If the Big Five were taken into account it would probably have little effect on mobility due to the fact that mobility is the basis of transportation to, from, and on the battlefield. How can expert marksmanship take the pressure off the ability to perform infantry battle drills? When I was a Private, we used to train for hours and days entering and clearing a room and bounding through squad attack. When there was downtime or a break from an administrative day, we would generally perform glass house drills (white engineer tape laid upon the ground in the shape of a room). All the battle drills always started out in the crawl phase and were run dry. No matter how many times we had cleared a room, we always started from a dry phase, moved to a blank-fire phase, and then performed live fire. The three-step process was repeated later once the day turned to night. This process has been in place for many years because it works. Teams, squads, or platoons may be flawless in their technique and movement through an objective, but may fail in effectively engaging the enemy with first or second round hits. It is very rare to encounter a site within the battlefield that affords the Ranger a platform to stop and obtain a flawless steady position. If a Ranger has the close quarters marksmanship skills to support and use the four fundamentals of marksmanship in less than ideal conditions, there is a greater likelihood of a successful mission. Accurate marksmanship not only eliminates the enemy quickly, but also saves vital ammunition and the need for additional resources. Medical training started when a I was in the Ranger Indoctrination Program and continued once I graduated to Batt Boy status. The requirement of every Ranger is to know Ranger First Responder ( RFR ) medical tasks. These tasks include: conducting a rapid patient survey (identifying potential problems with airway, breathing and circulation), inserting a nasopharyngeal airway and placing the patient in the recovery position, treating life threatening chest injuries with an occlusive dressing and performing a needle decompression if necessary, and controlling external bleeding using an emergency trauma dressing and/or tourniquet. All of the skills that are taught can save another Ranger’s life, but many Rangers, especially privates new in the Regiment have not had to perform these skill in a very high stress, life threatening environment. When that brown stuff hits the fan and quick and accurate 5.56 and 7.62 are placed into the enemy the probability of a private trying to place an Asherman Chest Seal on his Ranger buddy lowers considerably. It takes very few casualties in a Ranger platoon to make an element combat ineffective. With continued training of the big five and an extra emphasis on marksmanship, the Rangers and other soldiers throughout the military can take pressure off the potential of combining physical fitness, battle drills, and medical training into one big cluster on the battlefield.

Best Mossberg 500 Heat Shields 2020 Review

If you’re looking for a Mossberg 500 heat shield, then you have a task ahead of you. Finding a heat shield that is compatible with your shotgun will take time, and knowing how to distinguish a good one from a not so good one is critical. To save you some time, we’ve handpicked six of the best heat shields that we believe are the best for a Mossberg 500. Before we unveil our list, we’ll talk about what a heat shield is and why they are an important component for your shotgun. You’ll also learn what to look out for before choosing a heat shield of your own. At a Glance: Our Top Picks for Mossberg 500 Heat Shields OUR TOP PICK: Mossberg Heat Shield Mossberg Parkerized Heat Shield Kits BEST BUDGET OPTION: Advanced Technology - Heat Shield Advanced Technology - Deluxe Heat Shield w/Sights Mossberg - Barrel Heat Shield Kit, Parkerized Comparison Chart of the Best Mossberg " "500 Heat Shield" s" IMAGE PRODUCT Our Top Pick "Mossberg Heat Shield" Blue finish. Comes with mounting instruction. Best overall Mossberg heat shield. View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Mossberg "Parkerized Heat Shield" Kits Fits on a Mossberg 500 or 590. Available in three different finishes. Provides maximum heat protection. "View Latest Price" → "Read Customer Reviews" Best Budget Option Advanced Technology - Heat Shield Black oxidized finish. Constructed from steel. Designed to protect your hands from getting burned by a hot barrel. View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Advanced Technology - "Deluxe Heat Shield" w/Sights Constructed from steel. Maximum heat dissipation. Protects your hands from getting burned from touching the barrel. View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Mossberg - "Barrel Heat Shield" Kit, Parkerized Parkerized finish. Fits on most, if not all Mossberg shotguns. Comes with mounting hardware for easy installation. View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews ATI Outdoor Deluxe Heatshield with Ghost Ring Sights Matte black finish. Constructed from steel. Measures at 13.5 inches. View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews What is a Heat Shield and What is it Used For? Some shotgun users say that heat shields are designed for the sake of looks. However, others have said that heat shields are designed to prevent your hand from getting burned if you accidentally touch the barrel. Some shotguns (including the Mossberg 500) will heat up very quickly, especially after firing off numerous rounds. While it is optional to install a heat shield on your shotgun, it might be one of the best accessories to have. The debate is still open as to whether or not they are worth the investment. That's why it is important to take the opinion of fellow Mossberg owners with a grain of salt. How to Choose a Mossberg Heat Shield? It is important to distinguish great Mossberg heat shields from those of poor quality, especially if you are trying to find an excellent Mossberg heat shield of your own. Here are a few things that some past buyers recommend that you look out for: Easy To Install A lot of Mossberg owners aren’t equipped with advanced gunsmithing skills. If you’re one of those people, it is important to find a heat shield that is easy to install and won’t give you any frustrating issues. If you find the idea of installing a heat shield on your Mossberg intimidating, a professional gunsmith will probably be your best option. Source Material The most important thing to know about a heat shield is the overall quality. A heat shield will most likely be made from high-quality materials. Aluminum and steel are the most popular materials used to construct a heat shield. Generally, the materials will depend on the manufacturer. For example, a good type of aluminum to look out for is 7075-T6 aluminum, which is considered to be durable and proven to absorb a great deal of shock and recoil with each shot you take. Finish Another thing to note is that some Mossberg owners will purchase a heat shield based on looks alone. With that in mind, it is important to look at the finish of a heat shield. Ideally, you’ll want a heat shield that is finished in matte blue or matte black. Either finish will typically blend in with the barrel of your Mossberg shotgun. Quick Take - The Best Mossberg 500 Heat Shields These are our recommendations for the best Mossberg 500 heat shields: Mossberg Heat Shield Mossberg Parkerized Heat Shield Kits Advanced Technology - Heat Shield Review of the Best Mossberg 500 Heat Shields Below are six of the best Mossberg 500 heat shields that are currently available right now. Whether it’s for a certain barrel or from a certain brand, these six have proven themselves as worthy of inclusion on this list. Before making a decision, it is important to do your due diligence. Buyer’s remorse is the last thing you’ll want to deal with after purchasing a good quality gun accessory like a heat shield. Best Overall: ​ Mossberg Heat Shield CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Gives your shotgun a tactical aesthetic. Great for hunting and home defense shotguns. Fits perfectly on most Mossberg 500 and 590 shotguns. Cons None Our first heat shield is considered the best of the best for a Mossberg 500. This is the factory brand heat shield. If you're looking for a heat shield that gives off a distinctly tactical look, then this might be the heat shield for you. This blue-stained heat shield is compatible with not only Mossberg 500 shotguns but also Mossberg 590 shotguns as well. The included mounting instructions will give you a considerably easier time with the installation process. This is a great heat shield to have if you plan on converting a hunting shotgun into a home defense shotgun and may be ideal if you're also planning to get a new stock and barrel for your Mossberg 500 . Bottom Line This heat shield makes a Mossberg 500 look like a ferocious, intimidating beast. It should come as no surprise that this item has a blued finish, given that most tactical-style gun accessories are usually dark in color. Whether you're buying it for looks or for safety purposes, this Mossberg heat shield will effectively serve its purpose. Runner-up: ​ Mossberg Parkerized Heat Shield Kits CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Fits on most Mossbergs without a single issue. Will give your Mossberg 500 an intimidating look. Thanks to these shields, users were able to hold their shotgun barehanded after firing off numerous shots. Cons One reviewer says that it won’t fit some Mossbergs, such as the 590A1. Next up, we have the Mossberg Parkerized Heat Shield Kit. These heat shields come in three different finishes: Blued, Parkerized, and Marinecoat. If you have a plain barreled shotgun that needs an upgrade in the looks department, then this heat shield just might do the trick. The important thing to do is choose the heat shield that will stand out in the best way possible. You have three different finishes to choose from; if your personal preference leans towards a blued finish, go with that. If you want something that’s Parkerized, you can go that way instead. This is a factory-made heat shield that will fit your Mossberg 500. If you have a Mossberg 590, then you’ll probably want a heat shield for that too. The good news is that this heat shield will fit on a 590 with no issues. Bottom Line With three different finishes to choose from, Mossberg users can choose one that satisfies them the most. If you want your Mossberg to give off a more tactical look, the Parkerized or blued finish will be more to your liking. If you have a steel colored barrel on your Mossberg, the marinecoat finish might be the ideal choice. Regardless, this product is not only designed to make your Mossberg shotgun look better but will also protect your barrel from overheating after a long day on the range or out in the field. Best For The Money: ​ Advanced Technology - Heat Shield CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Easy to install. Pattern is excellent for heat dissipation. No need to remove when you need to clean the bore of your shotgun. Cons May not apply to all Mossberg shotguns. If you're a Mossberg owner in search of a heat shield but you don't want to break the bank, then the Advanced Technology heat shield may be exactly what you need. The first thing to stand out is that it has adapters and spacers that are designed specifically for the Mossberg 500 shotgun. When you install this heat shield, you won't have to worry about making any additional adjustments or modifications to your Mossberg 500. Constructed from steel that is lengthened to fit the barrel of your shotgun, this heat shield will protect your hands from getting burned if you accidentally touch the barrel of your gun. Plus, the heat from the barrel will dissipate quickly, making it safer to touch after firing off many shots. This product also has a black oxide finish that will usually blend in with most Mossberg barrels. If you’re worried about colors clashing together, you won’t have to worry about that with the Advanced Technology heat shield. Bottom Line As expected, the Advanced Technology heat shield rises above all the negative things you can say about budget heat shields. This isn't your average "you get what you pay for" heat shield. This is more of the "you get more than you paid for" kind, which means you're getting quite the bargain at the price that it's being sold for. This heat shield looks good on most rifles and will dissipate heat quickly like nothing else. If that's something you want in a heat shield, you'd be crazy to pass up the opportunity to look at the Advanced Technology heat shield a bit further. Best Heat Shield With Sight: ​ Advanced Technology - Deluxe Heat Shield w/Sights CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Excellent heat protection. Fits most Mossberg 500s without issue. A good heat shield at a price that most on a budget can afford. Cons Installation may be a challenge for most; hiring a gunsmith to install this may be ideal. For our next heat shield, we’re going to stick with the Advanced Technology brand. This time, we will be talking about the deluxe heat shield with sights. Right out of the gate, you’ll notice that this comes equipped with a ghost ring. This is standard with most sights that you’d install on a Mossberg 500. This will allow for the quickest target acquisition possible on your shotgun. So this might serve as your best buddy out in the field when you’re out hunting for big game. If you hate snagging, the front blades included in this heat shield will prevent that from ever happening. This may be a challenge to install and might require some patience and gunsmithing skills. However, if the idea of installing this intimidates you, your nearby gunsmith will help you out with the process. Aside from all of that, this heat shield will co-witness with almost any sight that you chose to install on your shotgun. If you’re looking for a heat shield that is compatible with most sights and will allow you a surface that is non-slip and secure, the Advanced Technology Deluxe Heat Shield may be exactly what you want for your Mossberg 500. Bottom Line One thing that has impressed us was the inclusion of the ghost ring. We were amazed at knowing that you can be able to acquire a target much quickly on a heat shield of all things. If you have a sight that may co-witness with a ghost ring, this might be the heat shield worth looking at. Like the previous Advanced Technologies heat shield before, this also does a great job dissipating heat in the quickest amount of time possible. This means you can be able to touch the barrel barehanded and not worry about getting burned. With that in mind, if you're looking for a heat shield that will double as a decent sight for your Mossberg, this version of the Advanced Technology heat shield may be exactly what you'll need. Best For Breacher Barrels: ​ Mossberg - Barrel Heat Shield Kit, Parkerized CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Very easy to install. Looks aesthetically pleasing. Will fit A1s and barrels with simple modifications. Cons Some users have had some issues with the installation process, so they have resolved to filing down or using a Dremel tool to ensure that it fits perfectly. Of course, we have Mossberg owners and enthusiasts who hold a deep appreciation for breacher barrels. If you're one of them, we have a heat shield that will fit your shotgun perfectly. This Mossberg Heat Shield Kit features a Parkerized version of a heat shield, which means it is designed to be durable while giving your shotgun a rugged look. Since this heat shield is a factory brand (Mossberg), expect this to fit not only on almost all Mossberg 500s but also on Mossberg 590s as well. If you have both models, why not get one for each? If you're worried about this heat shield not coming with the necessary mounting hardware, rest assured that it does. This means you'll have a heat shield that is easy to install and ready to go in minutes. Bottom Line If you have a Mossberg that is even an A1 model (i.e.--590A1), then you can be able to fit this with some modifications. If you have a Mossberg 500, odds are that this will also fit perfectly. The only difference is you may not need to do any modifications to either the heat shield or the shotgun itself. For a factory heat shield designed for breacher barrels, this does a good job dissipating heat and allowing the barrel to cool off much quicker than normal. If you’re looking for a heat shield that will look good and easily accommodate your breacher barrel of choice, the Mossberg Barrel Heat Shield is probably the one to choose. Best From ATI: ​ ATI "Outdoor Deluxe Heatshield" with "Ghost Ring Sights" CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Very easy to install. Fits most Mossberg shotguns. Does a great job protecting your hands from getting burned. Cons Some have complained about the sights being plastic and flimsy. Our final heat shield is considered the best from the ATI brand. ATI is the short name for Advanced Technologies. We’ll be looking at their Outdoor Deluxe Heatshield. One of the major features of this heat shield is the ghost ring sights that come equipped. Which means you’ll be able to acquire your target much faster than your standard Mossberg sights. That’s quite impressive, even if they are sights on a heat shield. This product is constructed from steel, making it a tough and durable heat shield. This also has a black matte finish that will blend in with most Mossberg shotguns. So, you don’t have to worry about two colors clashing together after the installation is all said and done. This is measured at about 13.5 inches long and will most likely fit almost every Mossberg 500 shotgun in existence. If you’re looking for a heat shield and not entirely sure if any of the others on this list will be able to fit, this might be your fail-safe solution. Bottom Line At this point, ATI is considered to be a prolific brand for heat shields. So far, we’ve been very impressed with what they have offered. If you’re looking for a brand to rely on in terms of heat shields (and possibly other Mossberg accessories), ATI might be the brand that deserves a deeper look. This barrel will most likely blend in with your Mossberg 500 shotgun thanks to its black matte finish. Plus, you have the benefit of getting ghost ring sights that will allow for excellent target acquisition and aim. So you’re getting something that will kill two birds with one stone. How to Install a Mossberg 500 Heat Shield Installing a Mossberg 500 heat shield can be a challenge. However, that does depend upon the kind of heat shield that you chose of the six listed above. If you want to learn how to install a heat shield on your Mossberg shotgun without ever having to enlist the help of a professional gunsmith, follow the directions step-by-step below. Here’s what you need to do: First and foremost, you’ll need to make sure that your Mossberg is unloaded. Next, remove the barrel. Do this by removing the action nut that is located below the barrel. Remove the screws from the heat shield. Before sliding the barrel in through the heat shield, make sure that the sight is aligned perfectly. Slide it all the way in. Place the ring that comes with the heat shield. Secure it with the screws that you removed prior to installation. Replace the barrel and the action nut. Make sure that the barrel and the heat shield are properly secure. Conclusion Finding the best Mossberg 500 heat shield is easy if you know exactly what you're looking for. Not only is it an excellent addition for the sake of looks, but it is also designed to give you the best in maximum protection and heat dissipation. You will no longer have to worry about burning your hand after accidentally touching the barrel. Remember to do your in-depth research on the heat shield of your choice prior to making a purchase. This will give you more intel on the item rather than having to rely on customer reviews alone.

Summary

World renowned firearms manufacturer Smith & Wesson continued to shake up both the company and the firearms industry recently with the announcement they are in the process of changing their name. The iconic company name was a result of efforts by Horace Smith & D. B.